AJACM

Abstracts 2010 Volume 5 Issue 2

A Country Practice: Characteristics of Patients of a Rural Acupuncture Clinic (Coyle)

Revised STandards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA): Extending the CONSORT Statement (MacPherson, Altman, Hammerschlag, Li, Wu, White and Moher)

Wen Bing (Warm Diseases) and the 2009 H1N1 Influenza (Koh) 

Plantar Fasciitis, Another Approach—Using Acupuncture and Looking Beyond the Lower Limb with a Brief Review of Conventional Care: A Case Series (Janz)

Treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Associated Neuropathy with Acupuncture and Moxibustion: A Case Report (Anastasi and Chang)

 

Coyle M. A Country Practice: Characteristics of Patients of a Rural Acupuncture Clinic. Aust J Acupunct Chin Med 2010;5(2):3-7.
The use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM), including acupuncture, in Australia is increasing. While data describing the characteristics of traditional Chinese medical practitioners and the nature of the workforce exist, there is comparatively little research into the users of traditional Chinese medicine in a private practice context. This study explores the characteristics of patients presenting at a rural Victorian acupuncture practice during the first two years of operation. Patients were typically female, married, and had a mean age of 44 years. The typical patient self-referred or was referred through the multidisciplinary clinic, and was taking vitamins or supplements. The most common reason for presentation was pain. Patient characteristics were similar to existing data for Australian CAM patients. In order to more accurately describe the users of acupuncture, practitioners must contribute to the literature. In addition, practitioners should describe issues that are unique to practice in their context.
KEYWORDS: acupuncture, clinic, patient characteristics, rural.

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MacPherson H, Altman DG, Hammerschlag R, Li YP, Wu TX, White A and Moher D. Revised STandards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA): Extending the CONSORT Statement. Aust J Acupunct Chin Med 2010;5(2):8-22.
The Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA) were published in five journals in 2001 and 2002. These guidelines, in the form of a checklist and explanations for use by authors and journal editors, were designed to improve reporting of acupuncture trials, particularly the interventions, thereby facilitating their interpretation and replication. Subsequent reviews of the application and impact of STRICTA have highlighted the value of STRICTA as well as scope for improvements and revision.To manage the revision process a collaboration between the STRICTA Group, the CONSORT Group and the Chinese Cochrane Centre was developed in 2008. An expert panel with 47 participants was convened that provided electronic feedback on a revised draft of the checklist. At a subsequent face-to-face meeting in Freiburg, a group of 21 participants further revised the STRICTA checklist and planned dissemination.The new STRICTA checklist, which is an official extension of CONSORT, includes 6 items and 17 subitems. These set out reporting guidelines for the acupuncture rationale, the details of needling, the treatment regimen, other components of treatment, the practitioner background and the control or compara-tor interventions. In addition, and as part of this revision process, the explanations for each item have been elaborated, and examples of good reporting for each item are provided. In addition, the word 'controlled' in STRICTA is replaced by 'clinical', to indicate that STRICTA is applicable to a broad range of clinical evaluation designs, including uncontrolled outcome studies and case reports. It is intended that the revised STRICTA checklist, in conjunction with both the main CONSORT statement and extension for non-pharmacological treatment, will raise the quality of reporting of clinical trials of acupuncture. 

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Koh A. Wen Bing (Warm Diseases) and the 2009 H1N1 Influenza. Aust J Acupunct Chin Med 2010;5(2):23-29.
The epidemiological data of influenza can serve as a basis for the effective use of wen bing ??theory in the management of the 2009 H1N1 influenza. The long history of Chinese medicine in general and of the wen bing school specifically holds much evidence on adapting and responding to changes in the climate, environment and newly emerging diseases. Uncovering and comparing these data and information from Chinese medicine with modern epidemiological ones can perhaps offer another legitimate and valid way of understanding and treating contemporary diseases. Such a methodology may also be another strategy for integrating biomedicine with Chinese medicine. This paper will examine some of the epidemiological features of the 2009 HIN1 influenza and their similarities with the main characteristics of wen bing or warm diseases in Chinese medicine. It is suggested that the 2009 H1N1 influenza can be managed from a wen bing perspective using a four phase approach.
KEYWORDS: wen bing, pandemic, H1N1, swine flu, influenza, lingering pathogens, epidemiology. 

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Janz S. Plantar Fasciitis, Another Approach—Using Acupuncture and Looking Beyond the Lower Limb with a Brief Review of Conventional Care: A Case Series. Aust J Acupunct Chin Med 2010;5(2):30-36.
Introduction: Plantar fasciitis is a common idiopathic debilitating condition linked to the biomechanics of the lower limb. Conventional care of stretching, splints, arch supports, extracorporeal shock wave therapy and cortisone injections offer inconsistent results. This case series demonstrates another approach to the management of plantar fasciitis utilising acupuncture and looking beyond the lower limb. In addition to commonly used points, two extra points are used with dense-disperse electro-stimulation. Case presentation: Two retrospective cases are presented. Case one is a 23-year-old Caucasian female who presented with a history of intermittent left heel pain which was painful especially on first step in the morning. Symptoms resolved after five acupuncture treatments addressing the plantar fascia, low back and leg-length imbalance. Symptoms would initially recur whenever a back injury recurred. The second case is a 46-year-old Caucasian male who presented with a 12-week history of bilateral plantar fasciitis confirmed on ultrasound. The patient also complained of mild low back pain. Acupuncture treatment addressing the plantar fascia, low back pain and leg-length imbalance led to complete resolution of symptoms after six weekly treatments. Conclusion: This case series adds to the limited literature on the treatment of plantar fasciitis with acupuncture and offers a low risk treatment strategy. Two extra acupuncture points are described and provisionally named. Three other areas are identified for further investigation. The first is an association between apparent leg-length difference and some cases of plantar fasciitis. The second is the question of whether platelet-derived growth factor is activated via the electroacupuncture aspect of the treatment. The third is the need to conduct a post-recovery imaging study of the plantar fascia in an attempt to correlate tendon changes to the mechanism of acupuncture treatment.
KEYWORDS: acupuncture, electroacupuncture, auriculotherapy, dry needling, leglength difference, plantar fasciitis. 

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Anastasi J and Chang M. Treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Associated Neuropathy with Acupuncture and Moxibustion: A Case Report. Aust J Acupunct Chin Med 2010;5(2):37-40.
Peripheral neuropathy is a common neurological complication of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and is often associated with the use of antiretroviral medications. The severe and debilitating pain can significantly impair quality of life. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) offers treatment modalities to manage distressing symptoms in addition to western interventions that often do not provide total relief and are associated with side effects. This case report illustrates a six-week course of acupuncture and moxibustion for a 49-year-old HIV-positive female. The outcome suggests that TCM may provide significant improvement and may be a valuable option for the effective management of HIV-related symptoms.
KEYWORDS: peripheral neuropathy, HIV, acupuncture, moxibustion.

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